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The Mexican in the United States

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Published by Arno Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Mexicans -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. [99]-123.

Statement[by] Emory S. Bogardus.
SeriesThe American immigration collection. Series II, University of Southern California. School of Research studies, no. 5., Social science series, no. 8., Social science series (Los Angeles), no. 8
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE184.M5 B6 1970
The Physical Object
Pagination126 p.
Number of Pages126
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5701736M
ISBN 10040500575X
LC Control Number70129389

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Mexicanos tells the rich and vibrant story of Mexicans in the United States. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by. Book Description: Newly revised and updated, Mexicanos tells the rich and vibrant story of Mexicans in the United States. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Newly revised and updated, Mexicanos tells the rich and vibrant story of Mexicans in the United States. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United s: 1. In the years since the first edition of this important study was published, the changes in the Mexican American community in the United States have been great indeed. This extensively revised edition-with a new title-includes expanded chapters on these new developments of the recent past: the Chicano Movimiento of the late sixties and seventies; their considerable political and economic 5/5(1).

Read this book on Questia. Porfirio Díaz, president of Mexico from to and again from to , famously observed [Poor Mexico, so far from God, so close to the United States.]The view of the United States as a neocolonial power exploiting its poorer neighbor still persists. This book gives a detailed account of the Mexican Railroad Worker in the United States post the Mexican War. The field worker experience is well documented. The rail worker not so much. A description of the living and employment conditions is quite vivid. The demographic breakdown of the Mexican Railroad Workers lends insight into the Cited by: 2. Reviewed in the United States on Decem Interesting that this, Katz's earlier book on the Revolution, has been ignored by reviewers while the apparently flashier character of Pancho Villa attracted several to his later by: The late, Dr. Jeffrey Marcos Garcilazo's book, Traqueros: Mexican Railroad Workers In The United States, , details the contributions of Mexican track workers in building railroads across the Midwestern/Western United States. While many immigrants helped construct these lines, such as Chinese, African Americans, and Italians there was no authoritative title on the contribution of.

The first third of the book covers the exploration of America by Spanish conquistadores, the establishment of colonies, and the gradual loss of these colonies to the United States. A lot of this section is also found in The author seems to have been writing this book /5(29). This study is a reinterpretation of nineteenth-century Mexican American history, examining Mexico's struggle to secure its northern border with repatriates from the United States, following a war that resulted in the loss of half Mexico's territory. The Great Pursuit: General John J. Pershing's Punitive Expedition Across the Rio Grande to Destroy the Mexican Bandit Pancho Villa. New York: Random House Meyers, William K. "Pancho Villa and the Multinationals: United States Mining Interests in Villista Mexico, –". Journal of Latin American Stud no. 2 (May ), – The Mexican period of Southwest history was very brief, lasting from , when Mexico achieved its independence from Spain, to , when the fledgling republic lost its northern territories to the United States with the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.¹ The most fateful trend in the Far North during this period was the continuing.